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CFIB to ask Ontario government to stop Bill 148 at Finance Committee

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Toronto, October 31, 2017 – The Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) will call on the Ontario government to halt Bill 148 ($15 minimum wage & labour and employment standards reforms) during its presentation today to the Ontario legislature’s Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs.

CFIB will appear before the committee from 10:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. in Committee Room 1 in the Main Legislative Building at Queen’s Park in Toronto.

Additionally, CFIB will ask the government to conduct a thorough economic impact analysis on its $15 minimum wage plan and proposed employment standards and labour reforms, and to consult on the results of the analysis before taking any further steps in moving Bill 148 through the legislative process.

“Our members cannot believe that the government insists on moving forward with its $15 minimum wage plan without any consultation, economic impact analysis or concern for the consequences on Ontario’s economy,” said Plamen Petkov, CFIB vice president, Ontario. “On behalf of our 42,000 members, we are calling on the government to halt this reckless decision, do their homework, and bring the results to Ontarians for meaningful consultation.”

“Businesses that survive the $15 minimum wage – and stay in Ontario – will have been forced to adapt by making hard choices,” said Julie Kwiecinski, CFIB director of provincial affairs, Ontario. “Our members have told us that they will increase prices (66.1%), reduce hiring (64.5%), cut employee hours (52.9%), and reduce staff (43.2%) – among other measures. Some have already started.”

To arrange an interview with Plamen Petkov or Julie Kwiecinski, please contact Andy Radia at 647-464-2814, or [email protected].

CFIB is Canada’s largest association of small- and medium-sized businesses with 109,000 members across every sector and region, including 42,000 in Ontario.