Manitoba » Budgets & Public Finance

 
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Manitoba – Budgets & Public Finance

Families charged $2,500 more than needed by Manitoba's largest municipalities

November 4, 2015
According to the Manitoba Municipal Spending Watch report’s second edition, Manitoba’s 26 largest municipalities continue to spend far more than needed on day-to-day operating spending.
 

The $68 billion question: How can cities cry poor while spending so much?

November 2, 2015
Just in time for budget season, "Canada’s Municipal Spending Watch 2015" shows that Canadian municipalities have already overspent to the tune of $68 billion over the last decade.
 

Municipal workers get richer as cities cry poor

June 4, 2015
A CFIB analysis released in advance of the annual conference of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) reveals that if city workers in Canada were paid in line with private sector norms, municipalities across the country would save $3.4 billion each year.
 

Municipal overspending costs Canadian households $7,800

May 28, 2014
Canada’s Municipal Spending Watch provides a snapshot of extravagance at municipalities across the country. The report pegs the total cost of municipal overspending nationwide at over $7,800 per household over 12 years.
 

Municipalities are richer than they think

February 24, 2014
As the country’s big city mayors prepare to meet in Ottawa this week, CFIB has released a new report that shows municipal governments are consistently misrepresenting how much tax money ends up in their coffers.
 

Big City Spenders

May 29, 2013
Spending by Canada’s three largest cities – Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver – has grown by 3 to 8 times the rate of population growth over the past 12 years, yet cities are talking about new taxes.

Weighing the “fiscal fitness” of Canadian governments: The good, bad and ugly

March 16, 2011
The CFIB report Restoring Canada’s Fiscal Fitness warns governments to either control their spending or risk following in the footsteps of Greece, Ireland and several US states that find themselves in financial crisis. Find out how your province and the federal government stack up against the rest.
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